KS-23

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KS-23
KS23.jpg
Statistics
 Users  Russian Ground Forces (prediction)
 Cartridge  23×75mmR (6.27 gauge)
 Capacity  3+1 internal tube magazine
 Fire Mode  Pump-Action

The KS-23 is an upcoming weapon in Squad.[1][2]

General Information[edit | edit source]

In the 1970s, the Soviet Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD) needed a weapon to suppress prison riots. As a result, the Soviet public corporation TsNIITochMash designed the KS-23, a pump-action 6.27 gauge shotgun, in 1971. The barrel for the KS-23 was made from 23 mm anti-aircraft gun barrels that failed the factory testing. These rejected barrels were deemed to be acceptable for the lower stress of firing slugs and less-lethal rounds, and thus were cut down in length for use as shotgun barrels. The KS-23 began to see use during 1985 by the Soviet police and several MVD forces. The KS-23 was exported to a few nations, namely Kazakhstan, North Korea, and Uzbekistan.

One of the KS-23's unique features is its large caliber, which fires a 23mm round (6.27 imperial gauge/4 metric gauge), making the gun the largest-bore shotgun in use today. The KS-23 has a barrel length of 510mm and an overall length of 1040 mm. The KS-23 has an underbarrel tubular magazine capable of holding three rounds, with one in the chamber giving the gun a maximum round capacity of four. The gun's effective range is 150 m.

Gameplay[edit | edit source]

Coming soon.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Media[edit | edit source]

Trivia[edit | edit source]

  • It is officially designated by the Russian military as a carbine since it uses a rifled barrel.
  • KS stands for Karabin Spetsialniy ("Special Carbine") and 23 indicates the caliber used for the weapon.
  • A misconception about the gun in Squad was that it was never officially adopted by the Russian Ground Forces and that it is mostly used by the Ministry of Internal Affairs, Russian law enforcement, and the Border Guard Service.

See also[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]